2012           2013           2014           2015           2016     
 
Holiday Calendar
Mexico - 2013
 
January
 S 
 M 
 T 
 W 
 T 
 F 
 S 
  1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31   
       
February
 S 
 M 
 T 
 W 
 T 
 F 
 S 
      1 2
34 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28   
       
March
 S 
 M 
 T 
 W 
 T 
 F 
 S 
      1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
1718 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31      
April
 S 
 M 
 T 
 W 
 T 
 F 
 S 
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30     
       
May
 S 
 M 
 T 
 W 
 T 
 F 
 S 
   1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31  
       
June
 S 
 M 
 T 
 W 
 T 
 F 
 S 
      1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30      
July
 S 
 M 
 T 
 W 
 T 
 F 
 S 
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31    
       
August
 S 
 M 
 T 
 W 
 T 
 F 
 S 
     1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
       
September
 S 
 M 
 T 
 W 
 T 
 F 
 S 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1516 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30      
       
October
 S 
 M 
 T 
 W 
 T 
 F 
 S 
   1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31   
       
November
 S 
 M 
 T 
 W 
 T 
 F 
 S 
      1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
1718 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
       
December
 S 
 M 
 T 
 W 
 T 
 F 
 S 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31     
       
PRINT CALENDAR
 
     2011           2012           2013           2014           2015     
 
Holiday List
Mexico - 2013
 
Date Week Day Holiday
January - 01 Tuesday
February - 04 Monday
March - 18 Monday
May - 01 Wednesday
September - 16 Monday
November - 18 Monday
December - 25 Wednesday

     
Location :      Year :      Get Calendar
     
 
Holidays in Mexico
New Year's Day
(Wan Khuen Pi Mai)
New Year's Day is the first day of the year. On the modern Gregorian calendar, it is celebrated on January 1.It is a national holiday. Banks, government offices and some stores are closed. This is usually a quiet day, as folks recuperate from the partying of the previous night. Archaeological sites, museums and other tourist attractions are open.There are numerous New Year traditions followed during the festive time. Most Mexicans have a late night dinner along with their families on New Year's Eve. People attend parties later on at squares, homes, and on the streets. Most major cities, towns and villages in Mexico host New Year parties and celebrations.One tradition is to eat twelve grapes at midnight on 31st December. While eating, people make a wish for the coming New Year.

Constitution Day
(Día de la Constitución)
Día de la Constitución, or Mexican Constitution Day.Traditionally Mexico celebrated the anniversary of its constitution on February 5th every year, however current Mexican labor law, effective 2006, now establishes that the Mexican Constitution be honored as an official holiday on the first Monday of February, regardless of the actual date. It is one of Mexico’s Fiestas Patrias or Patriotic Holidays.This day usually celebrated with the festivals and street celebrations.

Benito Juárez's birthday
(Natalicio de Benito Juárez)
March 21st is a National Holiday in Mexico to commemorate the birthday of Benito Juárez, who occupy the Presidency of the Republic on several occasions during the turbulent second half of the 19th century. He was born in the small village of San Pablo Guelatao, Oaxaca on March 21, 1806.This holiday was originally celebrated every year on the same date (March 21), but the federal labor law was modified in 2005 so the holiday is always celebrated on a Monday.

Labor Day
(Día del Trabajo)
1st May in Mexico celebrated as International Labor Day.In Mexico it is a day of rest for the workers as well as protest and rallies. Many government offices, banks, stores and offices will be closed May 1st (Primero de Mayo) in all of Mexico.There are several labor unions that unite together to protest specifically on this day to get better health benefits, better treatment, etc.

Independence Day
(Día de Independencia)

Every year on September 16th, the people of Mexico celebrate the day that they gained independence as a country.The largest Independence Day celebration takes place in Mexico City's Zocalo, which is decorated from the beginning of September with red, white and green lights and Mexican flags. On the 15th, at 11 pm the President of the Republic goes out onto the central balcony of the National Palace (Palacio Nacional), rings the bell (the same bell Hidalgo rang in 1810, brought to Mexico City in 1886) and cries to the people gathered in the square below, who enthusiastically respond "¡Viva!".The celebrations continue on the 16th with civic ceremonies and parades - the largest taking place in Mexico City, but perhaps the most touching festivities are those in small communities in which school children of all ages participate.

Revolution Day
(Día de la Revolución)
Mexicans remember and celebrate the Revolution of 1910 to 1920 every year on the 20th of November. This day is referred to as the Día de la Revolución, or commonly as el veinte de noviembre.The day is marked with parades and civic ceremonies throughout the country. There is a large parade in Mexico City's Zocalo, as well as speeches and official ceremonies. In cities and towns throughout Mexico schoolchildren dressed as revolutionaries participate in local parades.

Christmas
(Navidad)
The main Christmas celebration in Mexico is called las posadas, which refers to processions reenacting Joseph and Mary's search for a place to stay in Bethlehem. The processions begin nine days before Christmas because the original journey from Nazareth to Bethlehem took nine days.At midnight the birth of Christ is announced with fireworks, ringing bells and blowing whistles.Mexicans attend a midnight mass service which is called la Misa Del Gallo or "the rooster's mass," and at the mass they sing lullabies to Jesus.

 
*** Notes *** Please note that the holiday calendar is based on estimate only. This is not official calendar. We do not and can not guarantee the accuracy of this public holiday calendar.

If you think that the data is not correct, please report it to contact@portalseven.com and we will take necessary steps to update the data.